Roni Loren

Roni Loren

I’m still regularly tweaking my writing process even after ten years of writing professionally. So learn all you can, be open to feedback and advice but also pay attention to how your creative mind is best served. You are your own science experiment.

Romance author Roni Loren put aside writing to be ‘practical’ in college but it came back with a vengeance several years later. We chat to her about the challenges of not being a fast writer, knowing when your book is ready for publication and her maximum productivity writing routine.

Soniah Kamal

Soniah Kamal

Learning to tell a story deeply and develop characters takes years of practice, so if you want to be a serious writer then give yourself the gift of that learning curve.

When Soniah Kamal, an award-winning essayist and fiction author, was asked to speak at TEDx she talked about regrets and second chances. She explained how being denied her first dream of becoming an actress lead to the flourishing of her second – becoming an author. We chat to Soniah about waiting for inspiration, being a good literary citizen and the ever-changing nature of leading a literary life.

Mindy Mejia

Mindy Mejia

My mentor told all of her students that if we hadn't sent at least fifty queries we hadn't even tried… I ended up sending fifty-five in total and my agent was the fifty-first agent I'd queried.

Thriller author Mindy Mejia told herself she would write at least one great book before she died. So far she has written three. We chat to her about her long road to securing a literary agent, writing to process fears and maintaining daily motivation.

Colleen Oakley

Colleen Oakley

My first book took me three years to complete and was out on submission for a year and never sold. It was devastating and demoralizing and caused me to listen to a lot of Norah Jones on repeat, while drinking tequila, but looking back I realize it was just part of the process.

Colleen Oakley doesn’t avoid heavy topics. Her books cover the spectrum of the human experience from life to death with all the highs and lows in between. A former magazine editor, about to publish her third book, we caught up with Colleen to talk about perseverance, the importance of speaking up and her number one trick for staying motivated to write every day.

Kimberly Belle

Kimberly Belle

Writing was something I’ve always loved in theory, but it felt like a pipe dream. Beyond the shaky economics of the profession, writing meant putting myself out there in ways that can be really, really uncomfortable. Writing a story and sending it out into the world is a humbling, unnerving, terrifying thing. Did I really want to roll over and show the world my underbelly? Did I dare?

For Kimberly Belle losing her job, in the financial crisis of 2008, was a now or never moment when she could either look for another job or write the novel she had always dreamt of writing. She chose the novel and is now a bestselling domestic suspense author. We catch up with her to talk about her intensive outlining process, maintaining life-work balance and the number one trick to keep readers turning pages.

Patricia B. Tighe

Patricia B. Tighe

One of the best things you can do to market your book is to write the next one. That way there’s always something for a reader to look forward to.

Patricia Tighe was always a voracious reader, yet she didn’t start writing fiction until she was almost thirty. Since then she has published six YA romance novels and is currently working on a YA contemporary. She fills us in on generating word-of-mouth book buzz, studying the craft of writing and the importance of having supportive critique partners.

Briana Morgan

Briana Morgan

Write for yourself. If you are writing the book you want to read that passion will shine through and it will help you stay motivated to get the writing done. 

Briana Morgan is a YA horror and fantasy writer, playwright and freelance editor. She loves dark, suspenseful reads with angst-ridden relationships and complicated characters. We caught up with her to talk about the comparison trap, counterintuitive book marketing tactics and the surreal experience of having her play brought to life.

Cheyanne Young

Cheyanne Young

Read like your dream depends on it. Because it does. Read, read, read. Get a library card and read every book in your genre. You’ll pick up on subtle writing tips that you don’t even realize.

YA Author Cheyanne Young spent a decade working as a mechanical engineer before turning her attention to swoon-worthy love interests. We talk about how J.K. Rowling´s outlining method started her writing journey, the challenges of being a full-time author and her tips for slime-free book marketing.

Mel Greenberg

Mel Greenberg

If you have a story that intrigues you and the desire to tell it – take the leap. This has honestly been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.

Despite having a successful media career at a young age, for Mel Greenberg writing a book involved facing her biggest fear. Now having confronted and triumphed over self-doubt with the release of her debut novel, we catch up with Mel to talk about her grass-roots approach to book marketing and unexpected reader responses.

Amy Lukavics

Amy Lukavics

When I was nineteen, I lost a job that I thought I'd have forever and was totally crushed about it. I went to the library hoping to comfort myself with a big stack of books. When one of the books didn't end how I felt certain it would, it was like a light switch went off in my head. I realized for the first time that I was capable of writing my own story… It all came on very suddenly and out of nowhere, but it also felt very right.

Ever since she was little, Amy Lukavics was intrigued by horror books and movies. Yet it wasn't until an unexpected job loss that she realized that she could write her own stories. Now with a string of books, and literary award nominations, to her name she talks to us about the rollercoaster ride of publishing, including a catastrophic book rewrite that ended up being the being the biggest learning curve of her career.

Abigail Johnson

Abigail Johnson

Try not to compare your success with others. It’s way too easy to see someone’s books hitting lists or winning awards or getting star reviews and movie deals and feel dejected because your book didn’t… Success isn’t the same thing for everyone. Work hard and celebrate every good thing that comes your way.

After a year of querying her first book Abigail Johnson had given up hope. Discouraged, she resolved to shelve the project and move on. The following day a literary agent contacted her with a full request and within a few months her book was sold. Now awaiting the publication of her third YA novel, Abigail talks to us about the inspiration behind her books, a unique postcard book promotion campaign and finding a balance between writing and life.

C. G. Drews

C. G. Drews

Keep writing! Rewrite and edit and write a dozen more stories on top of it all. There’s honestly no better way to improve than to practice. It isn’t a fast process, but it doesn’t have to be! Just write and then write some more.

Australian author C. G. Drews grew up surrounded by books, so it was only natural that she would eventually want to write her own. With her debut novel launching last month we caught up with her to talk about breaking into the online writer community, self-doubt and how rejection makes her consider a career in cake testing.

Kelly deVos

Kelly deVos

Keep going. I think sometimes it can be easy to get stuck. I felt that way when I was revising and revising my first book. It helped to work on something new.

A third-generation native Arizonan, YA author Kelly deVos writes about strong, capable, feminist heroines. Following the success of her debut YA novel we catch up to talk about confidence, how she made the journey back to writing and making ALL the querying mistakes.

Natalia Leigh

Natalia Leigh

At one point I thought I would never be an author. It was my dream, but I doubted I’d ever achieve it. But then I got serious. I turned my dream into a plan, and my plan into a goal, and now I’ve written five novels. You can do this – just believe in yourself, and never give up.

Natalia Leigh almost gave up writing after a crushing rejection from her writing professor. Her determination severely tested, she persevered eventually publishing her first YA novel. She swings by WildMind Creative today to talk about overcoming rejection, establishing a writing routine that works for you and making book marketing fun. 

Hopeless Book Lover

Hopeless Book Lover

Do what you love! If you aren’t loving it, take a step back and reflect. Figure out what makes you happy and do it!

Hot off the press: Our Bookstagram interview with Hopeless Book Lover (aka Giselle Gonzalez). We chat about how to build a bookstagram following, the importance of doing what you love and how authors can work with her.

Anna Vera

Anna Vera

Everybody sees the world differently, and I see the world in details. Sometimes it’s the hush of a pastel dawn that’s inspiring. Sometimes it’s the look in an old man’s eyes when he holds a sun-bleached photograph of his younger self. Sometimes it’s my own heartbreak.   

Shyness and bullying was the impetus for Anna Vera to bury herself in reading. Reading led to writing and the release of her sci-fi novel When Stars Burn Out. Now working on the sequel we catch up with her to talk about dropping off social media, analyzing why you write and embracing the spiraling vertigo of vulnerability.

Alia Rose

Alia Rose

Do a lot of research. If there’s one thing I knew when I decided to go the indie publishing route it’s that I didn’t know much and had to learn how to do it. Get advice, read books and take advantage of services that are available.

YA romance writer Alia Rose is an indie author by night and full-time architectural designer by day. With her debut novel, My Lullaby of You released in June we catch up with her to talk about being guided by your ‘why’, her favorite book marketing methods and the beauty of to-do lists.

The Bibliotheque

The Bibliotheque

If I were to pick one single thing I look for in a book, I would go with love. I am a helpless romantic, so more often than not I find myself picking up books that promise a good, emotional, heart-wrenching love story.

In the first of our WildMind Creative Bookstagram Interview series we chat to The Bibliotheque, book blogger, die-hard romantic and professional page-twirler. She fills us in on getting started in bookstagram, how authors can work with her and her top reads of the year, so far. 

Joanna Ruth Meyer

Joanna Ruth Meyer

I’m a strong advocate for finding your own process and being true to it. What works for me or your favorite author or your critique partner might not work for you, and that’s totally okay. Create the way you and your stories need you to.

Young Adult Fantasy author Joanna Ruth Meyer is a dreamer, everyone that knows her says she’s not allowed to drive a car with a sunroof because she’ll get into an accident staring up at the stars. We catch up with her to talk about finding and listening to your critique partner, the bliss of playing with words and fitting in book marketing.  

Amy Trueblood

Amy Trueblood

Finish your story. First drafts can be defeating, but you need to hang in through the slog. Keep writing and pushing through until you can write 'The End'.

A lover of storytelling from a young age author Amy Trueblood fell in love with the world of publishing and writing after reading an advanced reading copy of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban. Now working on her second YA novel, we caught up with Amy to chat about her publishing journey and the joy of finding untold stories in history.